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Topic: Matheology § 291
Replies: 28   Last Post: Jun 19, 2013 5:29 PM

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Virgil

Posts: 9,012
Registered: 1/6/11
Re: Matheology � 291
Posted: Jun 16, 2013 7:36 PM
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In article <67c1f2ac-7aeb-460d-bda2-20eb341a718d@googlegroups.com>,
mueckenh@rz.fh-augsburg.de wrote:

> atheology § 291
>
>
> Only someone who (like the revionist) denies that the concepts and axioms
> of classical set theory have any meaning (or any well-defined meaning) could
> be satisfied with such a solution {{undecidability of the continuum
> hypothesis}}


To assume that presently unproven and apparently undecideable status of
the continuum hypothesis contradicts any of, say, ZF or ZFC or other
such system in which it can be expressed is deliberately to ignore a
great deal of well known logic.

Which behavior is SOP to WM.



It is well known, at least outside those the mind-numbing and opaque
walls of Wolkenmuekenheim, that any system sufficient to express
standard arithmetic, and thus express the continuum hypothesis, can also
express many statements that can neither be proved true not proved false
within that system.

The only way to demonstrate that the continuum hypothesis is not one of
those necessarily existent undecidables is by either proving it true or
proving it false in ZF or some other system n which it can be stated.

Note also that in WMytheology the continuum hypothesis cannot even be
stated correctly.
--





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