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Topic: Matheology § 300
Replies: 27   Last Post: Jul 9, 2013 2:53 PM

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Virgil

Posts: 9,012
Registered: 1/6/11
Re: Matheology � 300
Posted: Jul 7, 2013 10:47 PM
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In article <261fddc4-90cd-4981-8e45-8c4c46673916@googlegroups.com>,
Zeit Geist <tucsondrew@me.com> wrote:

> On Sunday, July 7, 2013 3:59:33 PM UTC-7, Julio Di Egidio wrote:
> > "Zeit Geist" <tucsondrew@me.com> wrote in message
> >
> > news:0625df72-d65d-4eba-8b67-6c0c7e1b335b@googlegroups.com...
> >
> >
> >

> > >> "That conclusion is patently illogical: at that very time t_n,
> >
> > >> 2 more marbles get in." Julio
> >
> > >
> >
> > > Which is treating the infinite just as the finite.
> >
> >
> >
> > Bollocks, you just cannot read, and I'll leave you at that.
> >

>
> I read at any finite, twice as many are put in than removed;
> hence, at any finite step it is NOT empty.
> Therefore, it is NOT empty after aleph_0 steps.
> And, that is invalid deduction!
>
> If that is not what that sentence means to you,
> please let me know how you interpret it.


I understand the tale thus:
A given vase is originally empty;
Numbered balls are inserted into the vase and removed such
that each numbered ball is entered into the vase at a time
before noon and that same ball is removed from the vase at a
later time but still before noon.

Is there anything wrong with that description?

If not then all the balls inserted into the vase before noon are also
removed before noon.
--





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