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Topic: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Replies: 29   Last Post: Jul 12, 2013 11:58 PM

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GS Chandy

Posts: 7,754
From: Hyderabad, Mumbai/Bangalore, India
Registered: 9/29/05
Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Posted: Jul 11, 2013 11:19 PM
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Responding to Wayne Bishop (Jul 12, 2013 3:22 AM), I agree with many of the points you have raised. In particular, I DO fully realize just how insidious the situation is: education is, probably, the crucial input that could perhaps help to change society - but the education system is itself 'corrupt' in many ways. In any case, it is resistant to any kind of correction. However, I still insist that the 'blow up' metaphor will get you no place at all (whether intended as an actual recommendation, or whether intended as satire). Herewith a few points, interspersed. I cannot here provide the entire argument: only you - and other stakeholders in your educational (and other) systems - could perhaps convince yourselves about how to do that. THAT is PRECISELY the argument I've been making ever since when.

Wayne Bishop posted Jul 12, 2013 3:22 AM:
>
>If it were only "a bit less of scarcely useful theory"
>all backed up by infamous "research-based" education
>publications there would be no need for the "blow up"
>metaphor but you really do not understand how insidious
>the situation is.
>

Throw out 'practically all' the "infamous 'research-based' education publications" if you will. I agree that most of the research on 'societal issues' is worth very little indeed (in regard to suggesting real action, in practice, on the ground). The little that is actually worth something to society will in any case come to light through the processes that I've suggested (once the stakeholders in the societal systems in question learn how to handle those systems - how to create change in those systems).

We are confronted here in India with even more 'insidious' a situation than are you in the USA: we are more than 1.2 BBBBillion, and we have much less **resources than have you; most of our educational 'systems' are even more recalcitrant (resistant to change) than are yours. (**Available, accessible, disposable resources).

So I do fully realize the kind of frustrations facing anyone wishing to make real change. We all need to realize that 'systems' do not change by simply 'blowing them up' - most of the needed change has to happen in our own 'mind-sets'. The 'systems' in place are mainly developed from our 'mind-sets'.
>
>My daughter's effective middle school pre-algebra/algebra teacher was a young engineer who really wanted teach but he did not want to jump through the legal hoops needed for the required public school teaching credential so he was teaching at her private school instead. Their loss, our gain. Another example from that school, it offers a great grade-by-grade fine arts supplement entitled "Meet the Masters" led by local college instructor with a PhD in art history. Pasadena Unified? Can't. No credential. The very popular Caltech PhD physics candidate teaching the AP Physics class at Marshall (the Pasadena Unified high school closest to my home) who had to be replaced by somebody from the district who was (according to a private conversation with the chair of the math department there) "not competent at the algebra level". Guess why and guess who was "properly" credentialed. "Properly" is different, of course, for administrators than for teaching faculty and each state!

has its own.
>
We have much the same situation here in India - and there are any number here in India of instances such as you've recounted. However, I still insist that no frustrated response such a 'blowing up the schools of education' will fetch you any worthwhile results.

What you have spoken of is precisely the nature of the 'systems' that are. 'Credentials' are everything to the 'system', in the 'system' - and the 'system' decides what 'credentials' it will accept. The underlying issue is, "what can we do, in practice on the ground, to develop a 'system' that actually works?" The underlying idea has to be "to develop an *effective* educational system for our needs". (*Effectiveness* in a 'system' is rather different from effectiveness in a machine).
>
> Bridgeport CT hired (maybe) the best-known, best-experienced education superintendent in the country. He set in place some changes in Chicago for which - like him or not - Arne Duncan received student performance improvement credit and went on to become Pres. Obama's Sec. of Education. Problem? Qualifications be damned; the law is the law:

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/rick_hess_straight_up/2013/07/the_bridgeport_mess_vallas_camp_is_right_on_merits_not_on_law.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+RickHessStraightUp+%28Rick+Hess+Straight+Up%29

Right. The 'law' is the law. The 'system' is the system. By blowing up the 'schools of education' you are not changing the system at all. It requires much more profound change; the changes have to come from the mindsets of the people who have created the 'systems' (often over generations).

Start afresh. Look at your 'systems' anew. Understand that your 'systems' aren't working. Understand just what it is that you need to do to create effective, lasting, sustainable change in your systems.

You - and others in the system - do have ideas. Learn how to put those ideas together - effectively, in practice on the ground - to create 'systemic change'.

As noted several times earlier, there is a (very little) learning involved - alongside a fair bit of 'unlearning', which is MUCH more difficult to do than any learning. 'Unlearning' demands changing our own mindsets.

GSC


Date Subject Author
6/23/13
Read Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Jerry P. Becker
6/24/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Richard Strausz
6/25/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Richard Strausz
6/25/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
GS Chandy
6/27/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Richard Strausz
7/2/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Richard Strausz
7/2/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
kirby urner
7/3/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
GS Chandy
7/9/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Richard Strausz
7/10/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Robert Hansen
7/10/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Wayne Bishop
7/9/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Richard Strausz
7/10/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Richard Strausz
7/12/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Robert Hansen
7/10/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Richard Strausz
7/10/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Wayne Bishop
7/10/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Richard Strausz
7/11/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
GS Chandy
7/11/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
GS Chandy
7/11/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Wayne Bishop
7/11/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
GS Chandy
7/12/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Wayne Bishop
7/12/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Richard Strausz
7/12/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Wayne Bishop
7/12/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Richard Strausz
7/12/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
r!chard tchen
7/12/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Richard Strausz
7/12/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
Richard Strausz
7/12/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
r!chard tchen
7/12/13
Read Re: Invitation to contribute to book for beginning teachers
GS Chandy

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