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Topic: (infinity) A real story
Replies: 6   Last Post: Oct 12, 2013 6:03 PM

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Ben Bacarisse

Posts: 1,971
Registered: 7/4/07
Re: (infinity) A real story
Posted: Oct 11, 2013 10:11 PM
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mueckenh@rz.fh-augsburg.de writes:

> On Friday, 11 October 2013 15:27:19 UTC+2, Ben Bacarisse wrote:
>> mueckenh@rz.fh-augsburg.de writes: > On Thursday, 10 October 2013 16:35:29
>
>> Yes, there are monotone sequences of set. Yes, what you say about
>> them is rubbish.

>
> I only say about them that they are monotone sequences.


No, you said this of them as well:

| The principle says that in a set of finite lines, there is always one
| line containing all elements of the set. Simple as that.
| And that priciple does not fail for infinite numbers of lines, because
| every line has a finite number of elements.

You snipped it again, presumably to avoid further exposure of this
nonsense. You also refused (again) to answer the question it raises
about the sequence in question ({1}, {1,2}, {1,2,3}, ...). What's that,
the sixth time?

You also didn't provide any references to support the claim that this
silly principle is widely held, despite pretending that Zermelo and
von Neumann were among those that held it. Where do they say what you
claim?

> In particilar the finite initial segments of |N are a strictly
> monotonic sequence. Without any single exception.


They are indeed. I am surprised, then, that you can can't say which one
"contains all elements of the set". You've said "the set" is not N, and
later you said that it is not an infinite, so what finite set has the
property claimed by this supposedly widely held (but so far un-cited)
principle?

> You call that rubbish. I call it mathematics.

No. Did you read my words? They are up there for all to see but I'll
re-quote them again here:

>> Yes, there are monotone sequences of set. Yes, what you say about
>> them is rubbish.


See? I called what your made-up principle *says* about that sequence
rubbish. That the finite initial segments of |N are a strictly
monotonic sequence is not in question.

Of course they form a strictly monotonic sequence. That's why your
principle applies to the sequence. That's why you keep snipping what
you said about it, because you can't even explain what "the set" it
refers to is in this case.

(Please don't tell me again that it's not N, and that it's not an
infinite set -- we'll be here for years if you keep saying what it
isn't. I want to know what it *is*.)

--
Ben.



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