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Topic: PHYSICS AND BRAINWASHING
Replies: 4   Last Post: Oct 30, 2013 4:29 AM

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Pentcho Valev

Posts: 3,368
Registered: 12/13/04
Re: PHYSICS AND BRAINWASHING
Posted: Oct 30, 2013 4:29 AM
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http://www.hep.man.ac.uk/u/roger/PHYS10302/lecture18.pdf
Roger Barlow, Professor of Particle Physics: "The Doppler effect - changes in frequencies when sources or observers are in motion - is familiar to anyone who has stood at the roadside and watched (and listened) to the cars go by. It applies to all types of wave, not just sound. (...) Moving Observer. Now suppose the source is fixed but the observer is moving towards the source, with speed v. In time t, ct/lambda waves pass a fixed point. A moving point adds another vt/lambda. So f'=(c+v)/lambda. (...) Relativistic Doppler Effect: These results depend on the absolute velocities of the source and observer, not just on the relative velocity of the two. That seems odd, but is allowable as sound waves are waves in a medium, and motion relative to the medium may legitimately matter. But for light (or EM radiation in general) there is no medium, and this must be wrong. This needs relativity. (...) If the source is regarded as fixed and the observer is moving, then the observer's clock runs slow. They will measure time intervals as being shorter than they are in the rest frame of the source, and so they will measure frequencies as being higher, again by a gamma factor: f'=(1+v/c)(gamma)f..."

Bingo the Einsteiniano analyses Barlow's text:

"In time t, ct/lambda waves pass a fixed point." That is, the speed of the waves relative to the fixed point (observer) is c, yes, yes, yes, Divine Albert said so.

"A moving point adds another vt/lambda." That is, the speed of the waves relative to the moving point (observer) is... c'=c+v... No! Help! Help! Not for light waves! Divine Albert did not say so! Barlow says "this must be wrong" for light! "This needs relativity" says Barlow! Barlow is right, Barlow is absolutely right: c'=c+v is wrong for light! Divine Albert said c'=c is true for light, not c'=c+v! We all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity! Yes we all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity!

Again: "A moving point adds another vt/lambda." That is, (c+v)t/lambda waves pass the moving point in time t. Antirelativists infer that the speed of the light waves relative to the moving point (observer) is, accordingly, c'=c+v, but they don't apply the relativistic corrections. Bingo the Einsteiniano does apply the relativistic corrections:

Bingo the Einsteiniano applies the relativistic corrections: If, in time t, (c+v)t/lambda waves pass the moving point (observer), and if the relativistic corrections are applied, then the speed of the light waves relative to the moving point (observer) is c'=c, not c'=c+v, Divine Einstein, yes we all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity!

http://www.haverford.edu/physics/songs/divine.htm
Divine Einstein! "No-one's as dee-vine as Albert Einstein not Maxwell, Curie, or Bohr! His fame went glo-bell, he won the Nobel - He should have been given four! No-one's as dee-vine as Albert Einstein, Professor with brains galore! No-one could outshine Professor Einstein! He gave us special relativity, That's always made him a hero to me! No-one's as dee-vine as Albert Einstein, Professor in overdrive!"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PkLLXhONvQ
We all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity. Yes we all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity. Everything is relative, even simultaneity, and soon Einstein's become a de facto physics deity. 'cos we all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity. We all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity. Yes we all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity.

Pentcho Valev



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