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Topic: Prime factorization
Replies: 17   Last Post: Nov 16, 2013 9:40 AM

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scattered

Posts: 80
Registered: 6/21/12
Re: Prime factorization
Posted: Nov 5, 2013 6:23 AM
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On Monday, November 4, 2013 8:02:56 PM UTC-5, me wrote:
> then, in that case, you are dealing with a special case.

There is a word for specail cases which show that a general statement is false -- they are called counterexamples. Furthermore the "special case" that you seem to glibly dismiss is the case which is the main focus of active research in factoring methods. Most people don't shrug off evidence that there work is both false and irrelevant.

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> Anyways, the problem should then be, factor a prime * a prime, not factor any number?
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> prime factoring is easy. Just not prime * prime?
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> On Monday, November 4, 2013 1:04:13 PM UTC-5, scattered wrote:
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> > On Monday, November 4, 2013 12:35:01 PM UTC-5, me wrote:
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> > > tell me what you think?
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> > > http://www.davesinvoice.com/papers/factorization2.pdf
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> > > -suresh
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> > 1) How could a probability be greater than 1? (Something you *seem* to claim)
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> > 2) Most numbers have small prime factors (in a way that can be made precise in terms of asymptotic densities) so in some sense most numbers have the property that it is relatively easy to find one of their prime factors simply by guessing. For example, guessing 2 nails it 50% of the time. How does that help you factor any specific number, especially one which is the product of two large primes? Answer: it doesn't.
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> > 3) If you think that your approach actually has any merit, why not use it to factor one of the RSA challenge numbers? If you think that factors are easy to guess then this should be a pretty easy challenge for you.




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