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Topic: Re: To K-12 teachers here: Another enjoyable post from Dan Meyer
Replies: 1   Last Post: Dec 16, 2013 10:55 AM

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Robert Hansen

Posts: 7,710
From: Florida
Registered: 6/22/09
Re: To K-12 teachers here: Another enjoyable post from Dan Meyer
Posted: Dec 16, 2013 10:55 AM
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att1.html (2.1 K)

Richard, can you comment on my paradox?

These lessons are orientated towards pre-calculus seniors.

How could a student successfully complete algebra, geometry and algebra 2 and be so completely deficient in the notion of mathematical argument as is depicted here?

This would indicate that they did not successfully complete algebra, geometry and algebra 2.

Yet here they are in precalculus.

Isn?t this the reason that Dan evades algebra and that this teacher evades directly talking to mathematical argument?

Isn?t the real problem that these students are in way over their heads?

Wouldn?t a more prudent solution be to continue the prerequisite courses till they get them right?

If it gets so bad that you are forced to substitute the notion of debate in place of mathematical argument, what?s the point anymore?

Bob Hansen

On Dec 16, 2013, at 8:02 AM, Richard Strausz <Richard.Strausz@farmington.k12.mi.us> wrote:

> This resource isn't from Meyer. PBS has some free videos for use in professional development. I just scanned a few of these and thought they looked beneficial.
>
> http://www.pbslearningmedia.org/collection/making-the-case/
>
> Richard
>





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