Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » sci.math.* » sci.math

Topic: There is no infinite set
Replies: 5   Last Post: Jan 11, 2014 6:20 AM

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List Jump to Tree View Jump to Tree View   Messages: [ Previous | Next ]
Dirk Van de moortel

Posts: 157
Registered: 12/6/11
Re: There is no infinite set
Posted: Jan 10, 2014 8:16 AM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

Albrecht <albstorz@gmx.de> wrote:
> On Friday, January 10, 2014 10:09:49 AM UTC+1, wpih...@gmail.com
> wrote:

>> On Friday, January 10, 2014 2:31:41 AM UTC-4, Albrecht wrote:
>>

>>> On Thursday, January 9, 2014 5:33:09 PM UTC+1, wpih...@gmail.com
>>> wrote:

>>
>>>
>>
>>>> On Thursday, January 9, 2014 2:09:51 AM UTC-4, Albrecht wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> The question is are the two statements identical.

>
> Your question. But not my question.
>
> My question is, how it is possible that seemingly intelligent people
> don't grasp that I don't assume a last element and that it is totally
> irrelevant whether my assumption is equivalent with some other
> assumptions or not.
>
> If there is a set with a first, a second, a third element, and no
> more elements, the set has exactly three elements. If the set doesn't
> have a third element, the set has less than three elements.
>
> Any other view is at least strange, but in fact nonsense.


I assume that you would say that:
the first element of the set {1,2} is 1.
the first element of the set {2,1} is 2.
Right?
Do you realise that {1,2} = {2,1} and therefore that
the notions of "the first element of a set", and in general,
"the n-th element of a set" are nonsense?

Dirk Vdm



Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.