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Topic: AP Calculus AB & AP Statistics & Math 2 Honors & Math 2 Standard?
Replies: 8   Last Post: Feb 10, 2014 11:45 AM

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Robert Hansen

Posts: 7,696
From: Florida
Registered: 6/22/09
Re: AP Calculus AB & AP Statistics & Math 2 Honors & Math 2 Standard?
Posted: Feb 10, 2014 12:53 AM
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On Feb 8, 2014, at 10:51 AM, Todd Fuller <tfuller52@aol.com> wrote:

> Now, next year, there is a possibility I might be asked to add AP Statistics. I do have a Stats minor in college. And I actually enjoy Stats better than most if not all math. But I am concerned that carrying three plannings, four if you count honors, gets to be too much, regardless of student load.

I have seen many AP teachers with 2 or 3 different classes. My AP calculus teacher (in 1978) taught at least 3 different classes, including a basic (remedial) math class. The basic math class was very unruly and packed (I was a teacher aid for him in my senior year). The other classes were much more mild and the AP class maybe had 10 students. But I have a lot of experience with the ?typical? AP calculus teacher and I think it is the norm for them to be tasked with different classes, and with far more students than your situation. Your situation is complicated by the abrupt change in curriculum (that I don?t agree with).


> By the way, my salary was $40K four years ago, was cut 10% campus wide the next year, then slight raise one year. IN other words, 4 years after I started, all at the same school, my salary is $36.9K; over $3K lower than when I started.

That seems low. When I started in software I made even less (adjusted for inflation). I started while still going to college and not knowing much about the world. But I was working in a large company with access to technology that I could only dream about at the time, so it didn?t phase me at first. If it was possible I would have paid them. When I did start realizing what the market price was for what I was doing, and when it started mattering to me, I learned something else. If you want to ?fix? your salary, you have to change companies. It is just unnatural in business for the same employee doing the same job at the same company to receive a substantial raise, even if they are substantially underpaid. There is too much going against such a ?fix?, like budgets, cost management and HR policy. There are probably even more such constraints with teachers. There are districts that pay AP teachers more than non AP teachers. There are districts that pay teachers in general more t!
han in other districts. I don?t know if the difference is enough for you to make a move but It seems that you are in the beginning of what is a 30 to 40 year career and if you are concerned with compensation, you might need to consider a strategic move.

Also, don't charter and private schools generally pay less than public schools? I always felt that teachers taught at these schools because they were easier to teach at without all the bureaucracy, red tape, and other factors, not because they paid better.

Bob Hansen



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