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Topic: Conflation
Replies: 5   Last Post: Mar 17, 2014 12:44 PM

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kirby urner

Posts: 1,757
Registered: 11/29/05
Re: Conflation
Posted: Mar 16, 2014 7:04 PM
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When your son spirals back through here, in the realm of estimation and
permitted "fuzziness" may I recommend unittesting?

We're big on TDD in my school which is akin to "checking your work".

Those us interested in why some languages get popular, then all of a sudden
die, might learn from this storytelling:

http://youtu.be/YX3iRjKj7C0

In my classes we look at almostEqual and almostNotEqual as tests wherein
you set the tolerance, and use floating point numbers.

I'm using a library called PyUnit but it's based on a library called
JUnit.

Something strong enough to cross the language barrier must be something
worth its salt.

We're also in the realm of logs (as in logarithms and "powers of 10" per
the famous movie).

http://youtu.be/38ti9BJiyvs (original classic from which derives a whole
genre)

http://scalometer.com/

When dimensions are bigger by an order of magnitude, so might errors be,
yet remain within tolerance.

The sun weighs so-and-so many times as the Earth, within how many Earths?
Mas o meno?

Kirby



On Sat, Mar 15, 2014 at 11:22 PM, Robert Hansen <bob@rsccore.com> wrote:

> .... And this was where things got dicey. Multimeters automatically
> change their scale according to the magnitude of the measurement.
>




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