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Topic: What's In a Selfie?
Replies: 20   Last Post: Mar 16, 2014 10:42 PM

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GS Chandy

Posts: 7,218
From: Hyderabad, Mumbai/Bangalore, India
Registered: 9/29/05
Re: What's In a Selfie?
Posted: Mar 16, 2014 10:42 PM
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Robert Hansen (RH) posted Mar 16, 2014 9:28 PM (http://mathforum.org/kb/message.jspa?messageID=9413626): GSC's remarks interspersed:
>
> On Mar 15, 2014, at 6:09 PM, GS Chandy
> <gs_chandy@yahoo.com> wrote:
>

> > Examine your post referred in that thread started
> > by Nathan, and you will find it is ALL 'lawyerly
> > phrasing'! Would you like to take a small
> > 'challenge' on that?

>
> Then point out the elements that are ?lawyerly
> phrased?. It says that you solicited funds and you
> continue to solicit funds. Is this untrue? Does it
> say that these funds are for trying the software?
> Does it even mention trying the software?
>

1. I really do not have the time (or inclination and energy) to point out for you the elements that are 'lawyerly phrased'. Just check out the post (dt. Dec 24, 2013 10:45 AM, http://mathforum.org/kb/message.jspa?messageID=9349807) for yourself, decide for once to be honest with yourself and with others, and you will find the post is, indeed, 'lawyerly phrased'.

2. Of course, you do have to understand the meaning of "lawyerly phrasing", "lawyerly phrased" and the like.

You will also have to decide for yourself what the phrase "being honest with yourself and with others" really means and proceed only after that if you are certain that your understanding of the phrase matches with that of the undersigned.

Given your implicitly claimed vast understanding of the English language (of which you have been giving us all a great many examples over the years here at Math-teach), I find it surprising - even astonishing - that you do not seem to know the meaning of the term "lawyerly phrased".

Hint: It is really not difficult or expensive to find out for yourself the meaning of the phrase in question, and to find the ways in which your above-referred post satisfies the definition of the phrase "lawyerly phrased".

3. If you absolutely, truly MUST have me to do it for you, it will cost you.

My fees, special rate for Robert Hansen, will be US $ 50,000, payable in advance, for a single, simple, short response comprising not more than two pages on A-4 size paper. The response will be couriered (by Indian equivalent/associate of FEDEX services) to an address provided by you within 24 hours of receipt of the fee in advance. (No guarantee that the response will reach you within 24 hours, only that someone at this end will hand it over to the courier services).

There will be no 'lawyerly discussions' whatsoever (i.e., of any sort or form) about the response provided, about whether you could have elsewhere gotten better and less expensive results, more detailed results, etc, etc, etc.

"LET THE BUYER BEWARE!"

4. I agree that the above fee will represent a sizable chunk from your annual income of US $ 20K, but we're all trying to match up with you, and this does seem to be an opportunity to achieve as you have.

5. If the above terms are not acceptable to you, okay, no issues whatsoever about that.

6. If you feel the above is "poking you with stick", you're quite possibly correct.
>
> If that was
> my intent, wouldn?t I have written something to that
> effect instead? Like, beware, if you try the software
> he will try to charge you for it.
>

See above.
>
> What exactly do you mean by ?lawyerly phrased??
>

See above.
> Saying exactly what I meant, no more and no less?
>

See above.
>
> And what do you mean small challenge?
>
> Bob Hansen
>

Read AND, if possible, understand the recent posts of mine where the phrase "small challenge" and before that, the word "challenge", had appeared. Seek and ye shall find.

GSC
("Still Shoveling! Not PUSHING!! Not GOADING!!!")



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