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Topic: Current misleading claims to be discussed . . .
Replies: 6   Last Post: Jun 5, 2014 6:16 PM

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Luis A. Afonso

Posts: 4,615
From: LIsbon (Portugal)
Registered: 2/16/05
Re: Current misleading claims to be discussed . . .
Posted: Jun 5, 2014 5:45 PM
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Because the current Symbols

Because the current symbols, H0: p=0, gave rise to a strong anxiety among Psychologists disguised in Statisticians, we advise to change it . . .
For example H0: p not distinguishable to 0, say
______________H0: p=0 n.d.
With this latter they stop (perhaps) to believe that the proposal is to state the arithmetic nullity of the parameter p.
Conversely Ha: p=/0 would be
_____________Ha: p=/0 a.s.
(a.s. read as, almost surely).
We can improve this way to set NHST:
______H0: p=0 n.d. at 5% level and n=40
______Ha: p=/0 a.s. at 5% level and n=40
This caution is advisable because a lot of Psychologists say that ´increasing the sample size, or the level, an insignificant value turns up significant´, the undisputable proof that the procedure is untenable.
Furthermore, they say, the Null Hypothesis is surely always wrong . . .
By the way . . .
Every time you find a significant value you do not fail the advise; THIS VALUE DOES NOT. AT ALL, MEANS THAT YOU HAD FOUND SOMETHING PRACTICALLY RELEVANT.

(Am I, or not, a true guardian angel towards all Scientific People excluding, of course, Psychologists that, them, no one is for that . . .).



Luis A. Afonso



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