Date: Nov 11, 2017 11:57 AM
Author: genmailus@gmail.com
Subject: Zelos Malum still struggling to understand what it means to be a<br> factor and how algebra works, but he is a PhD student!

Zelos Malum still struggling to understand what it means to be a factor and how algebra works, but he is a PhD student!

On Saturday, 11 November 2017 11:42:42 UTC-5, Zelos Malum wrote:
> >This moron claims to be studying for a PhD!!! BWaaaa haaaa haaaaa
>
> It isn't, we have all pointed out to functions that you cannot factor like that.


Liar. You haven't pointed out even ONE!

> You say it is always the case, why not show us for these functions?

If you knew what are proofs, then you would have known.
>
> ln x, a^x, sin x, cos x, tan x, cot x, sec x, csc x, haversin x, x^(1/p)


None of these functions are counter-examples. Get off your arse and read my beige articles. Chuckle.

>
> Fairly elementary functions.
>
> Through your own reasoning I can say that 2 is always a factor of any number, even 3, because 1.5*2=3.


In a sense it is! If we consider only rational numbers then that statement is true also. A product of factors which are rational numbers, but that is too advanced a concept for you. Chuckle. In fact, the idea of factor can be extended to real number also given the definition in the dictionary, that is,

**a number or quantity that when multiplied with another produces a given number or expression**

Now in algebra there are some things called symbols which represent variables. We work with these variables often without knowing whether they are rational numbers or not!

Example: x^2 = s

x is a factor of s because x * x = s.

What I am telling you is that you can do things with symbols and algebra. Do you understand monkey? Do you need more explanation? Chuckle.

Get it now you huge ape? Did you have grown orangutans or chimpanzees for teachers when you were at school?