Date: Jan 24, 2013 3:49 AM
Author: Virgil
Subject: Re: ZFC and God

In article 
<2e0e9710-7fd0-43d3-81d8-0e5fadd70693@u16g2000yqb.googlegroups.com>,
WM <mueckenh@rz.fh-augsburg.de> wrote:

> On 23 Jan., 23:57, Virgil <vir...@ligriv.com> wrote:
> > In article
> > <56122973-de7e-4200-8780-cd571b20d...@n8g2000yqd.googlegroups.com>,
> >
> >  WM <mueck...@rz.fh-augsburg.de> wrote:

> > > On 23 Jan., 19:56, Virgil <vir...@ligriv.com> wrote:
> >
> > > > > There it has meanwhile turned out ... But see it with your own eyes
> > > > > what you would not believe if I told you.

> >
> > > > We believe that the moderators ofhttp://math.stackexchange.comfound
> > > > the posting "of very low quality".

> >
> > > Here you can read it:
> > >http://www.hs-augsburg.de/~mueckenh/KB/complete%20tree.doc

> >
> > That  paper  starts with
> >
> > "How to distinguish between the complete and the incomplete infinite
> > binary tree?
> >
> > "How can we distinguish between that infinite binary tree that contains
> > only all finite initial segments of the infinite paths and the complete
> > infinite binary tree that in addition also contains all infinite path."
> >
> > But there is no difference between them anywhere outside of WMYTHEOLOGY.
> >
> > If there were, one would also have to have a difference between the set
> > which contains all finite initial segments of |N  and |N itself

>
> Correct. There is no difference. Therefore we can, in mathematics, use
> only the Binary Tree that contains all finite paths.


But if it contains all finite paths then it must contain nested
sequences of infinitely many finite paths whose unions are each one of
those uncountably many infinite paths.



More cannot be
> distinguished by nodes. It is the same set that contains all possible
> bit-sequences and is isomorphic to the set of all decimal fractions


Sets of bit sequences, being binary, are not the same as sets of decimal
sequences.



> that can be applied in mathematics and in Cantor's diagonal argument.
> We can neither distinguish nor apply by digits more than all
> terminating decimal fractions. Therefore all that appears in Cantor's
> list is terminating decimal fractions. Therefore Cantor proves the
> uncountability of a countable set.


Thus Cantor has= proved, among other things, that an infinite binary
sequence is not in any list of finite binary sequences, a result which
is hardly surprising to anyone other than WM.

But Cantor also proved that for any list of infinite binary sequence
there is an infinite binary sequence not included in it.
--