Date: Feb 4, 2013 7:00 PM
Author: fom
Subject: Re: Matheology § 203

On 2/4/2013 5:14 PM, Virgil wrote:
> In article <tbCdnURtDtB9so3MnZ2dnUVZ_sWdnZ2d@giganews.com>,
> fom <fomJUNK@nyms.net> wrote:
>

>>
>> From the beginning (I showed up when Zuhair was asking questions)
>> I have not understood terminology. A CIBT is the Cantor space.
>> It is a topological construct and the C refers to topological
>> completeness.

>
> In my disputes with WM, a "CIBT" or "COMPLETE INFINITE BINARY TREE"
> is a countably infinite set of nodes, with a unique root node and such
> that every node has two child nodes, a "left child" and a "right child",
> and every node but the root node has one parent node for which it is
> either a left child or a right child.
>
> One can model it with its nodes being positive naturals:
>
> 1
> / \
> / \
> 2 3
> / \ / \
> 4 5 6 7
> / \ / \ / \ / \
>
> So that the left child of any node n is 2*n and its right child is
> 2*n+1, and the parent of any node n except 1 is floor(n/2).

>>


Yes. I gathered that and it is nice to see it
framed classically.

Would not infinite binary tree suffice? What
confused me initially was the inclusion of the
modifier "complete".

When the corresponding edges are labelled
with 0's and 1's, the strings become the elements
of the Cantor space on two symbols.

Anyway, thank you for the clarification.