Date: Feb 14, 2013 1:44 PM
Author: Scott Berg
Subject: Re: infinity can't exist


"Michael Stemper" <mstemper@walkabout.empros.com> wrote in message
news:kfe0lj$1i2$1@dont-email.me...
> In article <13c1e093-ab86-45e6-9417-7526eb422a08@googlegroups.com>, Craig
> Feinstein <cafeinst@msn.com> writes:
>

>>Let's say I have a drawer of an infinite number of identical socks
>
>>Contents of drawer at time 0 =3D (Contents of drawer at time 1) plus (sock
>>=
>>taken out of drawer).
>>
>>Subtracting the equations, we get
>>
>>Nothing =3D sock taken out of drawer.
>>
>>This is false, so infinity cannot exist.=20
>>
>>How does modern mathematics resolve this paradox?

>
> Modern mathematics does not claim that an infinite number of socks can
> exist, and neither does modern physics.
>
> Although physics does not allow an infinite number of socks, it is easy
> to see that if a very large number of socks was brought together, they
> would
> collapse into a singularity. Your attempt to remove one of them would
> cause
> you to pass through the Sock Event Horizon, at which time you would no
> longer
> be able to remove any of them.
>


but what would happen if he was collecting them and putting them in one
place, and then the place starts to collapse in, would just his hand get
stuck ?

and how many socks from stable space to collapsing space would it take ? 1#
? 1000# ??