Date: Mar 10, 2013 3:20 PM
Author: William Hughes
Subject: Re: Matheology § 222 Back to the roots

On Mar 10, 7:12 pm, WM <mueck...@rz.fh-augsburg.de> wrote:
> On 10 Mrz., 18:24, William Hughes <wpihug...@gmail.com> wrote:
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> > On Mar 10, 6:05 pm, WM <mueck...@rz.fh-augsburg.de> wrote:
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> > > On 10 Mrz., 17:40, William Hughes <wpihug...@gmail.com> wrote:
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> > > > There is no findable line that is
> > > > coFIS to (d)

>
> > > (d) is *not* an actual infinite sequence but only a description in
> > > letters.

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> > > > g is a findable line.
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> > > > Do you agree with the statement
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> > > > g is not coFIS to (d)
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> > > Of course. The number m = max is not findable or fixable.
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> > So do you agree with the statement.
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> > If G is a set of lines of L with a findable
> > last element, then there is no line s of
> > G such that s is coFIS to (d)

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> Yes. How often will you ask?
> (d) is a prescription to find or to construct FIS d_1, ..., d_n.
>
> Would you expect that
> "write 0. and then add the digit 1 with no end" is coFIS with a line
> of
> 0.1
> 0.11
> 0.111
> ...
>

No, the other way round.

Recall

We will say x is coFIS to (y) iff
i. We have (x) associated to x and
(y) associated to y
ii. For every n, (x) and (y) produce the same
finite string.

The statement x is coFIS to (y) means approximately
that x and the potentially infinite sequence described
by (y) are COFIS.


Do you agree with the statement

For every n, the nth FIS of x is
contained in g iff
g is coFIS to (x)