Date: Mar 16, 2013 6:12 PM
Author: William Hughes
Subject: Re: Matheology § 224

On Mar 16, 7:38 pm, WM <mueck...@rz.fh-augsburg.de> wrote:
> On 16 Mrz., 19:26, William Hughes <wpihug...@gmail.com> wrote:
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> > On Mar 16, 7:10 pm, WM <mueck...@rz.fh-augsburg.de> wrote:
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> > > On 16 Mrz., 18:10, William Hughes <wpihug...@gmail.com> wrote:
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> > > > > Ok, I understand. Anyhow, if the number of lines is not empty, then
> > > > > there must remain at least one line as a necessary line.

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> > > > Not a particular line.  This is similar to
> > > > the case where any set of lines with an unfindable
> > > > last line has at least one "necessary" findable line.
> > > > This line has a line number in the original
> > > > list but we can choose the  "necessary"
> > > > findable line to have any line number we want.

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> > > No, it is always the last line. We call it unfindable or unfixable
> > > because as soon as we have found it, it is no longer the last line.

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> > Note, that I am not talking about the unfindable line,
> > but the "necessary" findable line.  We can choose this
> > line to have any line number we want

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> In potential infinity there is no necessary line except the last one.
> We know that with certainty from induction. Every found and fixed line
> n cannot be necessary, because the next line contains it.



And yet you agree that for a set
of lines to contain an unfindable line it is necessary
that it contain at least two findable lines.