Date: Apr 6, 2013 6:53 AM
Author: mueckenh@rz.fh-augsburg.de
Subject: Re: Matheology § 224

On 6 Apr., 11:41, William Hughes <wpihug...@gmail.com> wrote:

> > > > How do you call a set E the number of elements exceeds any given
> > > > natural number?

>
> > > E is a finite subset, thus the number of elements in E
> > > equals some given finite number (we do not know which
> > > finite number

>
> > Very interesting! You have my full support. Now there remains only a
> > little step to do. Since you cannot find anything that is in D but not
> > in E, we can extend your enlightenment:
> > |N is a finite set.

>
> nope


?

What is the difference between E (the set of numbers of lines that can
be removed without changing the union of the remaining lines) and the
set D (the set of numbers of all lines of the list
1
1, 2
1, 2, 3
...
)
?

By "difference" I mean something that can be substantiated in
mathematics and communicated by electrical signals in the internet,
not only your feeling that something unnameable should remain there.

Regards, WM