Date: Apr 6, 2013 12:42 PM
Author: William Hughes
Subject: Re: Matheology § 224

On Apr 6, 12:53 pm, WM <mueck...@rz.fh-augsburg.de> wrote:
> On 6 Apr., 11:41, William Hughes <wpihug...@gmail.com> wrote:
>

> > > > > How do you call a set E the number of elements exceeds any given
> > > > > natural number?

>
> > > > E is a finite subset, thus the number of elements in E
> > > > equals some given finite number (we do not know which
> > > > finite number

>
> > > Very interesting! You have my full support. Now there remains only a
> > > little step to do. Since you cannot find anything that is in D but not
> > > in E, we can extend your enlightenment:
> > > |N is a finite set.

>
> > nope
>
> ?


We are not in Wolkenmuekenheim.

In Wolkenmuekenheim we have the very intuitive idea
that there is an unfindable line that changes all the time
and may not be the same for two different people that
is the largest element of |N.

Outside Wolkenmuekenheim we have the unintuitive idea
that |N does not have a largest element. |N is an
infinite set of finite elements.