Date: Apr 6, 2013 1:02 PM
Author: William Hughes
Subject: Re: Matheology § 224

On Apr 6, 6:45 pm, WM <mueck...@rz.fh-augsburg.de> wrote:
> On 6 Apr., 18:34, William Hughes <wpihug...@gmail.com> wrote:
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> > On Apr 6, 1:01 pm, WM <mueck...@rz.fh-augsburg.de> wrote:
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> > > On 6 Apr., 12:02, William Hughes <wpihug...@gmail.com> wrote:
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> > > > On Apr 6, 11:42 am, WM <mueck...@rz.fh-augsburg.de> wrote:
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> > > > > On 5 Apr., 23:50, William Hughes <wpihug...@gmail.com> wrote:
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> > > > > > Then G has an infinite number of
> > > > > > elements, but you cannot name a single element of G.-

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> > > > > In D\E we have another situation. If someone claims that D\E contains
> > > > > an element e, then we can prove that it is not an element of D\E by
> > > > > induction, since E is an inductive set. This makes D\E being the empty
> > > > > set.

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> > > > Nope, we are not in Wolkenmuekenheim. E does not change.
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> > > Then you should not dare to name one of the elements of D\E.
> > > I would immediately be able to prove that it is not in D\E.

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> > Tell me which E you want to use.  I will
> > name an element that is  in D\E.

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> I will not leave any line that has a follower, i.e., I will use all
> finite lines (given that "all lines" is a meaningful notion for
> infinite sets.)


You cannot. E has a largest element. The set of all finite
lines does not.