Some subscribers to Math-Teach  might be interested in a recent discussion-list post "Re: The Word Not Mentioned in the Debate: Poverty" [Hake (2012)]. An abstract is:

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ABSTRACT: Diane Ravitch in her hard hitting "Diane Ravitch's blog" <http://dianeravitch.net/> wrote in an entry "The Word Not Mentioned in the Debate: Poverty" at http://bit.ly/RfuGY4:

"Poverty. Lots of talk about the middle class. Tax cuts for the middle class. Saving the middle class. Doing more for the middle class. Not one word about poverty. No mention that nearly 25% of the children in the world's richest nation live in poverty. Not one word."

The overriding influence of poverty on educational achievement has been noted in, e.g. (alphabetical order by author):

1. "Our Impoverished View of Educational Reform" [Berliner (2005)], at <http://bit.ly/ff8BVj>;

2. "Poverty and Potential: Out-of-School Factors and School Success" [Berliner (2009)], at <http://bit.ly/fqiCUA>;

3. "Whither Opportunity? Rising Inequality, Schools, and Children's Life Chances"
 [Duncan & Murnane (2011a)] at <http://bit.ly/nCkmKv>;

4. "Economic inequality: The real cause of the urban school problem," [Duncan & Murnane (2011b)] at <http://bit.ly/rv3rMO>.

5. "To Improve Schools, Fight Poverty, Education Expert Says" [Gosier (2011)], online at <http://bit.ly/qyrBSL> - the expert is Stephen Krashen <http://bit.ly/Ui9xm1>;

6. "Re: Economic Inequality: The Real Cause of Urban School Problems #2" [Hake (2011a)] at <http://bit.ly/ozuZEn>;

7.  "Is the 'Teacher Effect' the Dominant Factor in Students' Academic Gain?" [Hake (2011b)], online at <http://bit.ly/g6UWUZ>

8. "Is the 'Teacher Effect' the Dominant Factor in Students' Academic Gain? #3" [Hake (2011c)], online at  <http://bit.ly/jy61UB>;

9. "Class Matters. Why Won't We Admit It?" [Ladd & Fiske (2011)] at <http://nyti.ms/vx3nub>;

10. "Education and Poverty: Visualizations of World, US, and State-level Educational Data" [Marder (2011)] at <http://bit.ly/nYC6eF>;

11. "Failure of U.S. Public Secondary Schools in Mathematics" [Marder (2012)] at <http://bit.ly/KPitWM>;

12. "The hard bigotry of low expectations and low priorities" [Ravani (2011b)] at
<http://bit.ly/sUZ17T>;

13. "Unaddressed Link Between Poverty & Education" [Schaffer (2011)] at <http://bit.ly/tbckql>.
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To access the complete 8 kB post please click on <http://bit.ly/QJWvds>.

Richard Hake, Emeritus Professor of Physics, Indiana University
Links to Articles: <http://bit.ly/a6M5y0>
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"Data from the
National Assessment of Educational Progress show that more than 40 percent of the variation in average reading scores and 46 percent of the variation in average math scores across states is associated with variation in child poverty rates."
     - Ladd & Fiske (2011)

REFERENCES [URL's shortened by <http://bit.ly/> and accessed on 04 Oct 2012.
Hake, R.R. 2012. "Re: The Word Not Mentioned in the Debate: Poverty," online on the OPEN AERA-L archives at <http://bit.ly/QJWvds>. Post of 4 Oct 2012 12:56:14-0700 to AERA-L and Net-Gold. The abstract and link to the complete post are being transmitted to several discussion lists and are also on my blog "Hake'sEdStuff" at <xxxxx> with a provision for comments.

Ladd, H.F. & E.B. Fiske. 2011. "Class Matters. Why Won't We Admit It?" New York Times Opinion Piece, online at <http://nyti.ms/vx3nub>.