It's the same issue. Consider...

Be able to poke holes.
Be able to scrape.
Be able to pry.
Be able to twist.

I am describing what a screwdriver can do. If I wanted to teach you about screwdrivers I would start with a screwdriver, not its use cases. Likewise, to teach you arithmetic I would start by teaching you arithmetic, not its use cases. I think I am going to clean that up and call it the fundamental rule of teaching.

That is the problem with designing a curriculum around a list of standards. If teachers would just teach arithmetic first, and well, most of the use cases will follow. The rest will follow as you start applying arithmetic to problems. What is the point of teaching students the multiplication facts, and at the same time, the distributive property? What are they going to distribute? Every topic of this series is approached in this manner. Garbled with half a dozen use cases of something that hasn't even been fully taught yet.

Bob Hansen


On Oct 8, 2012, at 2:20 PM, Paul A. Tanner III <upprho@gmail.com> wrote:

How does what you see here

http://www.ixl.com/math/standards/common-core/grade-4

compare to what you see there?