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Topic: [ap-stat] explaining r^2
Replies: 1   Last Post: Nov 1, 2011 2:26 AM

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Kerry Ratigan

Posts: 8
Registered: 11/1/11
re:[ap-stat] explaining r^2
Posted: Nov 1, 2011 2:26 AM
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I'm also new to AP Stats and I'd like to add on to this question...

If someone says:

According to the model, an R-squared of .86 means that 86% of the variation in y can be accounted for by x.

Is that OK? The language in my textbook and the AP review books seems inconsistent on the best way to phrase this and I wouldn't want my students to get penalized on the exam.

Also, does anyone have any examples with data that illustrate an extremely high R-squared (like 99%), but nonlinear data? Or a very low R-squared (like 10%), but a useful model? We discussed this issue in class and one of my students was skeptical that these situations could occur with real data.

Thank you!
Kerry

Teda International School
Tianjin, China
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