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Topic: Proof of the Collatz Conjecture
Replies: 12   Last Post: Jan 12, 2013 11:19 PM

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markofmod@gmail.com

Posts: 9
Registered: 12/29/12
Re: Proof of the Collatz Conjecture
Posted: Dec 30, 2012 10:23 PM
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On Sunday, December 30, 2012 12:30:13 PM UTC-5, Pubkeybreaker wrote:
> If you don't have a degree in math, then the last thing any
> journal needs is a 'proof' from a deluded crank.
>
> Based on the description of your proof, I put you in the
> latter category.


I do indeed have a degree in mathematics and advanced degrees in physics. As it is the holidays, I am not presently in contact with my colleagues in academia and merely thought that someone would have a *useful* suggestion. I am sorry that you consider me a "deluded crank." I have proven the Collatz conjecture, not that I can square the circle.

The requirements for proving the Collatz conjecture are simple: 1) "no infinite divergent trajectory occurs" (that's my "infinite tree") and 2) "no cycle occurs apart from the trivial (1, 2) cycle". My proof meets those requirements. No more, no less. I am confident of its correctness and will gladly discuss it with anyone who is interested.

For the more collegial among you, I am currently considering rewriting for and submitting to "The Journal of Number Theory". It ranks fairly well among the mathematics journals of the United States and the focus would seem to be a good fit for the Collatz conjecture.



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