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Topic: Darts!
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Paul Seigel

Posts: 1
From: Tampa
Registered: 2/27/13
Darts!
Posted: Feb 27, 2013 7:49 AM
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Hi everyone. My name is Paul Seigel. I know absolutely nothing about math but I need the help of some creative peole who do. This may be the wrong place to post this so please accept my aoplogy if I am way out of line. I write - and have for 20 years - a column about professional darts. Feel free to check out my website at http://www.dartoidsworld.com.

I am working on a column called One Trillion Darts that flows from an articale I read recently in the Fiscal Tims that attampeted to bring the incomprehensiblity of a trillion to vivid life. A couple of examples: It would take the 26,000 trees in Central Park 769 years to lose a trillion leaves OR If you work 40 hours a week, you would have to make $480,769,231 per hour to earn $1 trillion in a year.

I am reaching out here in the hope that a few of you might be willing to suggest some similar creative tidbits/factoids relating to darts (maybe some of you play the game) and based on the following data:

- One trip to the board and back (to throw and retrieve three darts) requires a player to walk 15' 8.5".
- The average weight of a darts is 24 grams.
- The average length of a dart, from point to flight, is 5 inches.
- With three darts (one throw or handful or trip to the line - you get three darts each time you throw) the highest score any player can hit is 180 points (three darts in the triple 20 segment).
- On average, it may take a player about 10 seconds to throw three darts.

Again, I appreciate that this may be the wrong fourm to ask this and I apologize if that is the case. But I sure would appreciate some help. Thanks in advance.

Feel free to e-mail me any ideas at Dartoid1@hotmail.com.



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