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Topic: Not a "crank"
Replies: 8   Last Post: Dec 24, 2009 4:18 PM

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John Manimas Medeiros

Posts: 5
From: Vermont
Registered: 2/11/08
Not a "crank"
Posted: Mar 22, 2008 9:02 AM
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It is unfair and possibly a revelation of fixed authoritarian doctrines to designate my work the work of a "crank." Anyone who looks at my work can see immediately that I do not claim to have constructed a line length of "infinite pi" that is pi precise to an infinite number of decimal places. I do claim to have constructed a line length of pi to the 9th decimal place 3.141592653..., using only the compass and straightedge in accordance with the simple rules governing geometric constructions.
Why do "mathematicians" respond so violently and irrationally to such a proposition, fully described in detail for all to see? Is it because they have forgotten geometry and cannot do it, cannot stand to do something so simple and are fixed on confining themselves to the obscure?
I am certain my work is valid and correct, and that means that the ancients probably knew how to construct a line lenth of 3.141592653... and then squares and circles equal in area to THAT LEVEL OF PRECISION. My proposition is an addition to the HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS and the history of pi. Why are "mathematicians" so closed to this possibility? So angry and resentful that this is possible? Is your mind closed shut to this proposition? If so, WHY? Where is the open mind of science?



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