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Topic: The 4th Dimension is in the center of the equilateral pyramid.
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gooddad@rock.com

Posts: 3
Registered: 3/30/08
The 4th Dimension is in the center of the equilateral pyramid.
Posted: Mar 30, 2008 9:29 PM
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It's geometry. You find the point in the center of the lower
dimension, and extend outward in a new direction. For 0 dimensions is
a point. You extend outward and form a line which is the first
dimension. From the center of the line you extend outward in a new
direction, and form an equilateral triangle which is the second
dimension. From the center of this triangle, you extend outward in a
new direction, and form an equilateral pyramid, which is the 3rd
dimension. Likewise, from the center of this pyramid, you extend
outward in a new direction and form an equilateral superpyramid which
is the 4th dimension. In the fourth dimension there is more space,
and just as the 2nd dimension imprisons and makes up the sides of the
3rd dimensional figure, the 3rd dimension imprisons and makes up the
sides of the 4 dimensional figure. So each [side of the] of the 5
sides of 4th dimensional equilateral superpyramid is an equilateral
pyramid. You can imagine that each side of the 3rd dimensional
equilateral pyramid had another 3-D equilateral pyramid stuck onto
it. The center pyramid forms the base of the 4th dimensional
superpyramid, and the point of each of the other 4 pyramids folds into
the fourth dimension in a new direction so that they meet in a point
immediately over, and which extends down to center of the base
pyramid, just as the three triangles which are the sides of the 3rd
dimensional pyramid meet in a point directly above the center of the
original 2nd dimensional triangle.

There is more space in the 4th dimension. This is geometry. 0, 1, 2,
and 3 dimensions are geometry, so I do not see why the 4th dimension
should not be geometry as well. I see no reason to say the fourth
dimension is time. There should be an infinite number of geometric
dimensions. I learned this in part by reading the book Flatland by
Edwin A. Abbott. There is also a book called Spaceland by Rudy
Rucker. But I myself found the points to figure out exactly where the
4th dimension is and should be.

A related fact is that the ancient egyptians buried their pharaohs in
the center of the pyramid. The only difference is that those pyramids
has squares for bases and so were not actually equilateral pyramids.
It is reported that Napolean Bonaparte once spent the night in the
center of the pyramid and "when he emerged, it was reported that he
looked visibly shaken. When an aide asked him if he had witnessed
anything mysterious, he replied that he had no comment, and that he
never wanted the incident mentioned again. Years later, when he was on
his deathbed, a close friend asked him what really happened in the
King's chamber. He was about to tell him and stopped. Then he shook
his head and said, "No, what's the use. You'd never believe me."



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