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Topic: RE: IA #36
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Stelios Orfanidis

Posts: 29
Registered: 1/30/05
RE: IA #36
Posted: Jun 17, 2008 1:19 PM
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Why would you not accept it, the x ordinate is correct and so is the y ordinate. I could see if they had (-1, 9)...no credit...furthermore, they clearly understand by their response that the roots of the equation exist when the parabola crosses the x-axis at these two points, thus y=0.


---- Rishana Bloom <rishanabloom@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> We accepted it.
> Rishana Bloom
> Sleepy Hollow High School
>
>
> Subject: IA #36Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2008 12:43:00 -0400From: rsgroi1014@bcsdny.orgTo: nysmathab@mathforum.org
>
>
>
>
> My department is engaged in a battle about the graph of the parabola. While we recognize that the roots of the equation are x=-1 and x=3, some department members want to accept ?roots = (-1,0) and (3,0)?. They insist that it will be accepted elsewhere. Could some of you weigh in on this please.
>
> Thanks
>
> Rich
> _________________________________________________________________
> The i?m Talkathon starts 6/24/08.  For now, give amongst yourselves.
> http://www.imtalkathon.com?source=TXT_EML_WLH_LearnMore_GiveAmongst


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