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Topic: [ap-calculus] Re: Obscure Exponential Function
Replies: 1   Last Post: Nov 14, 2003 1:21 PM

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Richard J Maher

Posts: 80
Registered: 12/6/04
[ap-calculus] Re: Obscure Exponential Function
Posted: Nov 14, 2003 1:21 PM
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Hello all,

What does 4^3^x mean? Well ...............

1: To me, analytically, it means 4^(3^x), since when we write
it down, we really are forming the composition f(g(x)), with
f(x) = 4^x and g(x) = 3^x.

2: To my TI-83+, it means (4^3)^x, since that's what it
computes for any fixed value of x.

3: To the computer algebra systems on my SWP (Mu-pad and
Maple) it means 4^(3^x), since that's what it computes for
any fixed value of x.

Hope this helps,

Dick Maher

Richard J. Maher
Mathematics and Statistics
Loyola University Chicago
6525 N. Sheridan Rd.
Chicago, Illinois 60626
1-773-508-3565
rjm@math.luc.edu







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