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Topic: vZome
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Kirby Urner

Posts: 4,709
Registered: 12/6/04
Posted: Jan 15, 2009 5:49 PM
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Ed Wall and others have been touting vZome over on


That's what our school's mvp D. Koski uses to dissect
and explore the great rhombicosadodecahedron, the
enneacontahedron and stuff. We use his work to make
exclusive release high definition videos for our upscale
coffee salons network. People like to bliss out on
these shapes while sipping a latte, reading a magazine
(sound optional).**

Here's an example:
(not done with vZome though)

Here's a sample Koski vZome in my maths blog:


also (more recent):
(scroll to bottom)

http://www.vorthmann.org/zome/ (don't have to pay!)


In today's NASA news:

Methane -- four atoms of hydrogen bound to a carbon atom -- is the main component of natural gas on Earth. It is of interest to astrobiologists because much of Earth's methane come from living organisms digesting their nutrients. However, life is not required to produce the gas. Other purely geological processes, like oxidation of iron, also release methane. "Right now, we don't have enough information to tell if biology or geology -- or both -- is producing the methane on Mars," said Mumma. "But it does tell us that the planet is still alive, at least in a geologic sense. It's as if Mars is challenging us, saying, hey, find out what this means."

[ http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2009/15jan_marsmethane.htm?list760659 ]

** http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Oad0libltM
(about triacontahedron -- exclusive to CSN).

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