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Topic: Test Scores Don't Matter
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Wayne Bishop

Posts: 4,975
Registered: 12/6/04
Test Scores Don't Matter
Posted: Aug 27, 2000 11:16 AM
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[At least not to the wise teacher educators of this soon-to-be defunct
list. (wb)]

http://www.accessatlanta.com/partners/ajc/epaper/editions/today/local_news_938a0b6e415132d0008d.html

Eye on perfection

Georgia campuses enroll bumper crop with flawless SATs
James Salzer _ Staff
Sunday, August 27, 2000

The score is Georgia Tech 12, University of Georgia 1.

No, the Yellow Jackets and Dogs don't meet on the
gridiron until late November, but Tech is already
buzzing about besting UGA this fall in freshmen with
perfect SAT scores.

For Tech, the 12 perfect_scoring freshmen are a
record and double the number of last year. It's the
kind of bumper crop that makes reputations for
academic recruiters.

"Georgia Tech has a wonderful reputation, which
precedes everything we do," said Deborah Smith,
director of admissions at Tech. "People know
Georgia Tech. They understand that they can get a
great education for a small amount of money."

These students include Atlanta Joshua Justice, 18,
a guitar_playing, philosophy_reading Westminster
Schools graduate and Tech computer science major
who has designed Web pages for years. He scored
a perfect 1600 the first time he took the SAT.

"I always knew Tech was one of the top schools for
computer science," said Justice, who indicated he
may eventually attend a seminary.

Or discrete mathematics major Matt Powell, 18, of Columbus, a son of a
middle school teacher who considered taking his 1600 to the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology. "It (Tech) is probably the best school for the
money,"
Powell said.

Tech and UGA cost about $1,600 per semester in tuition and fees for in_state
students. Tuition alone at MIT is $13,000 per term.

Half of the Tech freshmen who scored 1600 are from Georgia, as is Kunal
Mitra, UGA's lone 1600, and Asha Shah, an Emory University freshman with a
perfect score.

Although scores on the college entrance SAT have been on the rise during the
1990s, officials with the College Board, which administers the exam, said
about the same percentage of students each year get 800s on both the math
and verbal sections.

Last year, about 700 students did so.

This year's national scores will be released Tuesday. Last year's average
score nationally for graduating seniors was 1016 and 969 in Georgia.

Tech's 12 perfect scores put it among the nation's elite, but not at the
top. For
instance, MIT had 33 students start school this fall with perfect 1600s,
according to school officials.

Lisa Hofler, 18, a chemical engineering major from a Chesapeake, Va., family
of chemical engineers, said Tech's Atlanta location helped sell her.

"I did not have any idea where I wanted to go to school," said Hofler,
who had
a 1600 SAT and 4.825 grade point average boosted by Advanced Placement
courses. "I applied to nine schools. Duke had no chemical engineering.
Cornell
and MIT were too cold."

Tech officials kept calling her, and she flew down for a visit.

"I really like the buildings. I really like the downtown. My (dorm) room
overlooks the interstate, and I like that because I like to see the cars
and the
people."

The SAT is seen as a pretty good indicator of how students will do in
their first
year of college, but Hofler doesn't expect Tech to be a breeze.

"I am totally not expecting that because there are so many smart people at
Tech," she said.





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