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Topic: Re: Homework/First Day (fwd)
Replies: 1   Last Post: Aug 19, 1996 7:10 PM

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Bob Hayden

Posts: 2,384
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: Homework/First Day (fwd)
Posted: Aug 19, 1996 3:03 PM
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These are interesting exercises but what do they have to do with
statistics? I think a good opening exercise should give the students
an idea of what the course is going to be about.

*******************************************************************

Regarding the first day, here are two activities. The first is the
"classic" handshake problem in ehich the question is: is every person
shakes hands with all others in the room, how many handshakes would there
be? This is a good chance to look at some counting as well as developing
an intuitive recursive formula for solving the problem.

The second is to arrange the desks in a block, 3x4, 5x5, 5x6, or whatever
you have, and ask if it is possible for students to sit in each desk and
then all change seats by moving to only a horizontally or vertically
adjacent desk. Some nice patterns, and properties of hamilton circuits
(hint, hint) in an mxn rectangle can emerge here.

Hope this helps.

Chuck

----- End of forwarded message from Charles Biehl -----

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