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Topic: AP Test Contents: Type I & II & Power
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Al Coons

Posts: 898
Registered: 12/4/04
AP Test Contents: Type I & II & Power
Posted: Jan 4, 1997 8:19 AM
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Happy New Year everyone:

A few days ago I asked Dick Scheaffer if Type I and Type II errors or Power
are part of the
AP Statisitics Test. With his permission, here is his answer. Thanks Dick.


In a message dated 1/3/97 12:53:23 PM, scheaffe@Stat.UFL.Edu (Richard
Scheaffer) wrote:

<<

There is no specific mention of Type I and Type II errors or Power in the
AP Statisitcs outline as presented in the Course Description. Whether
the errors are specifically named or not, it seems to me that a student
should be familiar with how one can go wrong in a test of significance,
and how the error rates are affected by sample size, distance between the
null and alternative values of the parameter, etc. For example,
it generally surprises students that we can make any difference
between null and alternative values statistically significant if the
sample size is large enough. So, statistical significance is not the whole
story and is often not that big a deal.

Students will have to understand P-values and significance levels.>>
---------------------
Forwarded message:
From: scheaffe@Stat.UFL.Edu (Richard Scheaffer)
To: AlCoons@aol.com
Date: 97-01-03 12:53:23 EST


Al,

There is no specific mention of Type I and Type II errors or Power in the
AP Statisitcs outline as presented in the Course Description. Whether
the errors are specifically named or not, it seems to me that a student
should be familiar with how one can go wrong in a test of significance,
and how the error rates are affected by sample size, distance between the
null and alternative values of the parameter, etc. For example,
it generally surprises students that we can make any difference
between null and alternative values statistically significant if the
sample size is large enough. So, statistical significance is not the whole
story and is often not that big a deal.

Students will have to understand P-values and significance levels.

Regards,

Dick

PS Feel free to share this response if you think it helpful.





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