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Topic: Re: Absolute shocked! Final vs Regents? Give both or just
one?

Replies: 3   Last Post: Jun 23, 2009 10:29 AM

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Loretta Boyce

Posts: 126
Registered: 12/3/04
Re: Absolute shocked! Final vs Regents? Give both or just
one?

Posted: Jun 22, 2009 4:35 PM
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My department head teaches the algebra course and gave her own final last year based on the fact that the Regents scale wasn't going to be out until rating day. I did the same thing with geometry this year. She didn't give a final exam this year, thinking she would use the Regents grade and is now regretting it. After seeing the geometry exam, I'm thinking I want to stick with my own final exam and give the Regents as well. As you pointed out, this way I know it is a fairly well written and fairly well rounded exam. I hate to grade two full exams every year for each student and I hate for them to feel like they are tested to death, but I can't see them walking away from a Regents being asked about the formula of a circle three times when there are topics that aren't even asked about.

What is everyone else doing?

Loretta

Mathematics Teacher
Dana L. West Jr-Sr High School
30 Maple Ave
Port Byron, NY 13140

(315)776-5728 ext 1258
>>> <msedfun@aol.com> 06/22/09 11:18 AM >>>

Perhaps we have reached a point where each school should construct a final exam in IA which is well written, well rounded, and tests on what was taught, and basically ignore the grade that is received on the regents.

I am highly frustrated at this point.? My student population, which is almost entirely special ed, benefits from the low score needed to pass.? With good teaching all year, and solid regents preparation, however, many of them did better than just the 30 needed for a 65.? Some of them were actually penalized for their good performance.? Maybe it wasn't only Math A and B that needed an overhaul. Perhaps the entire math testing system needs to be carefully looked at.? It isn't that I am not in favor of some type of state administered exit testing in math - that's fine - but the test needs to be fair.? Stop with the phony scores that help the state to say that the majority of the students are passing, and start giving tests based on 100 points where the scores will be valid.

Sharon







-----Original Message-----
From: George Reuter <reuterg@canandaiguaschools.org>
To: nyshsmath@mathforum.org
Sent: Mon, Jun 22, 2009 6:27 am
Subject: Re: Absolute shocked!










Nicholas,

I think you bring up a good point.

The only scores that are actually computed by State Ed are the scores for 65 and
for 85. Everything else is done by cubic regression, since the set of points
{(0, 0), (pass, 65), (mastery, 85), (max, 100)} determine a unique cubic. Try
it sometime with an old B rubric ... eerie...

The meaning of 80 or 89 is totally obscured now. Simply put, 80 means that a
student got almost mastery and an 89 means that a student hit mastery but not
close to perfection.

Why a district would use such nonsense numbers to calculate the final grade of a
kid who might need to pass the course to graduate is beyond my comprehension.

Respectfully submitted,
George Reuter
Canandaigua Academy

>>> Nicholas Bianculli <nbiancul@ic.sunysb.edu> 06/21/09 9:45 PM >>>
I think what ends up happening is that 65, 80, 85, 89, and 100 have simply
changed their meanings.

65 means a very minimal competency, but enough not to prevent someone from
graduating high school.

The 80 vs. 89 example from this new perspective: 80 is not mastery, while 89 is
significantly above mastery, and this is known to us as math teachers (or at
least most of us) and, in a few years, will be known to college admissions
officers (at least in NYS) and scoring 89 as opposed to 80 will distinguish one
student from another, whereas in the past it may not have.

Whatever label one puts on a minimal performance or a superior performance, as
long as we are being consistent we can gauge student performance and interpret
scores accordingly.

Maybe it would help if we went to a 1-2-3-4 scoring format as we do for the K-8
exams, although this would cause headaches for schools that use the Regents
score in calculating final class grades.

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