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Topic: The Continuing Climate Meltdown WSJ artical
Replies: 11   Last Post: Feb 26, 2010 7:10 PM

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Larry Hammick

Posts: 1,876
From: Vancouver
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: The Continuing Climate Meltdown WSJ artical
Posted: Feb 16, 2010 2:53 PM
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[

"spudnik" <Space998@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:5f5a8cee-644c-461b-83ee-df9463abbaff@j6g2000vbd.googlegroups.com...
sea-level is not rising, globally --
http://www.21stcenturysciencetech.com/Articles%202007/MornerInterview.pdf
-- and warming is mostly equatorial. however,
there is massive loss of soil, and that might change *relative* sea-
level,
in some locations, as well as dysplace some sea!

thus quoth:
Let’s take a look at the complexity of polar bear life. First, the
polar bear has been around for about 250,000 years, having survived
both an Ice Age, and the last Interglacial period (130,000 years ago),
when there was virtually no ice at the North Pole. Clearly, polar
bears have adapted to the changing environment, as evidenced by their
presence today.
(This fact alone makes the polar bear smarter than Al Gore and the
other global warming alarmists. Perhaps the polar bear survived the
last Interglacial because it did not have computer climate models that
said polar bears should not have survived!)
http://www.21stcenturysciencetech.com/Articles%202007/GW_polarbears.pdf
http://www.21stcenturysciencetech.com/Global_Warming.html


> It amuses me that the people who want "change" are so afraid of
> change--God
> forbid that the seal level rise two inches.


thus:
the photographic record that I saw,
in some rather eclectic compendium of Einsteinmania,
seemed to show quite a "bending" effect, I must say;
not that the usual interpretation is correct, though.

Nude Scientist said:
> > "Enter another piece of luck for Einstein. We now know that the light-
> > bending effect was actually too small for Eddington to have discerned


]

Looks like the crisis is in capable hands:
http://bit.ly/9lFlpE





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