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Topic: "Confessions of a Converted Lecturer" by Eric Mazur
Replies: 1   Last Post: Apr 7, 2011 5:11 PM

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Jonathan Groves

Posts: 2,068
From: Kaplan University, Argosy University, Florida Institute of Technology
Registered: 8/18/05
"Confessions of a Converted Lecturer" by Eric Mazur
Posted: Mar 20, 2010 11:02 AM
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Dear All,

Early this week, Richard Hake, a physics professor, had shared a link
with us for a video on Eric Mazur's talk "Confessions of a Converted
Lecturer." The link to his talk is http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WwslBPj8GgI.

A copy of the PowerPoint slides he uses in the talk can be found at
http://tinyurl.com/ybc53jw.

Eric Mazur used to believe that his lecturing had made him a great
teacher and that his students really were learning physics. But he then
later discovered that his students were merely memorizing information
and that his course did not help increase their conceptual understanding
of physics. Many of his students could make some rather sophisticated
calculations on exams, but they had little understanding of the basic
principles behind physics.

I will post my thoughts later about Mazur's talk. I recommend it
highly because this talk provides yet more evidence of the problems of
relying on lecturing as a primary teaching tool. And I find Mazur's
talk informative and interesting and entertaining to watch.


Jonathan Groves



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