Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » Inactive » calc_reform

Topic: Re: What makes a topic important?
Replies: 4   Last Post: May 1, 2001 2:59 AM

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List Jump to Tree View Jump to Tree View   Messages: [ Previous | Next ]
Paul Patten

Posts: 1
Registered: 12/8/04
Re: What makes a topic important?
Posted: Apr 27, 2001 9:15 AM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

There is another problem with this particular `sacred cow'. When I de-emphasize the quadratic formula and use completing the square or even showing how to derive a continued fraction for one of the solutions students rebel. They expect to see and use the quadratic formula. HOw much of what we teach is determined not only by tradition, but by student expectations that are rooted in their high school experience?

>>> <LnMcmullin@AOL.COM> - 4/26/01 12:29 PM >>>

That is the difference isn't it? Science and engineering vs. Math. The most
sacred of all Cows may be the Quadratic Formula. To a mathematician it is
beautiful and an object of admiration in many ways and, I might add, for good
reason. To anyone else it's a way to get the solution to a quadratic
equation; one of several and certainly these days probably the most difficult
to use. In fact given a choice no one would use it. So what do we do with it,
curriculum wise?

Lin McMullin
Niantic, CT.


------------------------------------------------------------

-HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE

To UNSUBSCRIBE from the calc-reform mailing list,
send mail to:

majordomo@ams.org

with the following in the message body:

unsubscribe calc-reform your_email_address


-Information on the subject line is disregarded.





Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.