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Topic: Re: [mg4654] Re: [mg4573] Trilinear plots
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Guenther Gsaller

Posts: 1
Registered: 12/7/04
Re: [mg4654] Re: [mg4573] Trilinear plots
Posted: Aug 25, 1996 5:59 PM
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At 3:55 Uhr 22.08.1996, Xah Lee wrote:
>At 5:15 AM 96/8/16, Michael Friendly wrote:
>>I'm looking for ideas on how to do trilinear plots, ie, plots
>>on three axes which form an equilateral triangle (where the three coords are
>>usually scaled so they sum to 1 for each observation)?
>>
>>Equivalently, this plot can be described as a plot of the locations of 3D
>>points in the plane defined by x+y+z=1.

>
>Holy cow! This seems very interesting. Just for the curiosity of how
>functions would appear as such plot, I might be interested to write a
>package for it, with user specifying arbitrary number of axes and slant.
>
>Can anyone give me some information about such plot? Such as more detailed
>description, its use?



This kind of plots are often used in geography, geochemistry to visualize
data of different fields. Because my wife teaches geography, I have seen
them before.

Examples:
Part of Soil: sand, clay, Schluff (German word)
Part of BIP for different countries: agriculture, industry, tertiar sector
Part of people working in agriculture, industry, service for different
sized communities

I have an article, written in German, how to use such plots. If I can help
you let me know.

Guenther

--------------------------
Guenther Gsaller
guenther.gsaller@ivnet.co.at
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