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Topic: What is the simplest 2nd Order Logical statement you can think of?
Replies: 4   Last Post: Dec 26, 2011 8:39 AM

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patmpowers@gmail.com

Posts: 34
Registered: 5/19/07
Re: What is the simplest 2nd Order Logical statement you can think of?
Posted: Dec 26, 2011 6:55 AM
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On Dec 26, 3:02 pm, Graham Cooper <grahamcoop...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Dec 26, 4:55 pm, Rupert <rupertmccal...@yahoo.com> wrote:
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> > On Dec 25, 9:16 pm, Graham Cooper <grahamcoop...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > > Mine is:
>
> > > FORALL(f): FORALL(x): FORALL(y): f(x)=y <-> f'(y)=x
>
> > > Does anyone in SCI.MATH actually know what 2OL is??
>
> > > Some examples would help!
>
> > > Herc
>
> > A second-order language is a language which contains quantifiable
> > variables ranging over subsets or relations or functions on the domain
> > of discourse. But just because you are trying to prove a formula which
> > is most naturally expressed in a second-order language, doesn't mean
> > you have to use the full power of second-order logic to prove it.

>
> THERE IS NO 2ND ORDER LANGUAGE OF ANYTHING
> THERE IS NO LANGUAGE OF ARITHMETIC OF THIS OR THAT
>
> They are FANTASY CONSTRUCTS INVENTED TO CIRCUMVENT THE FACT
> CARDINALITY ONLY EXISTS IN SYSTEMS OF 2OL.
>
> Saying "IN THE 2ND ORDER THEORY OF ARITHMETIC..."
>
> is like saying "on the trinity planet of Zeus where integrals contain
> between 4-78 terms".
>
> IT's STILL CALCULUS.
>
> FORALL(F):X->Y IS 2OL NO MATTER HOW YOU PROVE IT... MORON!
>
> Herc


Yet another classic sci.physics post.



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