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Topic: Absolute Logic Is Singularity Of Relativity. By Aiya-Oba
Replies: 2   Last Post: Jul 27, 2012 4:34 AM

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Absolute Logic Is Singularity Of Relativity. By Aiya-Oba
Posted: May 16, 2012 4:30 PM
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Absolute logic is singularity, oneness and equator of the relative
pairness logic of Space.

Thus, (2A + B) + (2B + A) ... = 3 (A + B).

Where A and B, can be any integer or value, but never both zero.

Say, A = mc2 and B = m.

(2 x mc2 + m) + (2 x m + mc2) = 3(mc2 + m)

Where c (3x10^8), is the speed of ligh t(equator of the
electromagnetic spectrum), and m, is one unit of mass, as in Albert
Einstein's mass-energy equivalence equation.

Such that,

(2 x 9x10^16 + 1x10^16) + ( 2 x1x10^16 + 9x10^16) = 3(mc2 + m)

= 3x10^17 = 3(1x10^17).

Oneness of pair (equator of self-contradiction is the absolute
logic.of nature.


It's natural relative logic,
that every human being
is either female or male.
The natural absolute logic,
is that male or female,
every human being is equator
(oneness of self-contradiction),
of pair of male and female Chromosomes.
As in 23 + 32 = 55.

It's natural relative logic,
that the Earth, our planet,
is either flat or round.
The natural absolute logic,
is that the Earth is both flat and round.
The Earth is indeed equator
(oneness of self-contradiction),
of pair of flat and round spaces,
as in oneness of particle and wave,
mass and light. -Aiya-Oba (Philosopher).
http://www.groupsrv.com/science/about193612.html



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