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Topic: Reposition 3D plane slice
Replies: 16   Last Post: Jun 15, 2012 5:22 PM

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Myles

Posts: 11
Registered: 6/14/12
Reposition 3D plane slice
Posted: Jun 14, 2012 4:28 PM
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"Matt J" wrote in message <jrdfit$g9q$1@newscl01ah.mathworks.com>...
> "Myles" wrote in message <jrdeu6$d7r$1@newscl01ah.mathworks.com>...
> >
> > I've managed to plot everything again - but it doesn't look right. The shapes are preserved, but none of them are lying in just the x-y axis, they've all still changed in the z direction as well. Is this perhaps because my assumption that x0 = [0 0 0] is incorrect?

> =================
>
> But the points should all be lying in a plane parallel to the xy-plane, which means you should be able to just discard all the z-coordinates or set them to zero. Is this not what you're seeing?
>
> You are right, though, that we have so far assumed x0=0. If you want to rotate the points directly into the xy plane, you must choose x0 as some point on the axis where the original plane and the xy plane intersect, which should be easy to solve for.


Sorry, I guess I wasn't specific enough - I have three separate groups of points (all of which still lie in the same plane originally), after the transformation two are lying in the same plane and one is lying a long distance away. However, none of them are parallel to the xy axis. I've uploaded a few pictures so you can see better what I'm trying to say.

http://s177.photobucket.com/albums/w227/MilesMaybe/MATLAB%20images/

Again, I appreciate the help!



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