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Topic: [math-learn] The Effective But Forgotten Benezet Method of K-8 Education
Replies: 4   Last Post: Sep 3, 2012 1:51 PM

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Ed Wall

Posts: 837
Registered: 12/3/04
Re: [math-learn] The Effective But Forgotten Benezet Method of K-8 Education
Posted: Sep 3, 2012 1:51 PM
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Thank you. This seems interesting.

There is, I mention, the work of Jean Lave and others about 'informal' mathematics and there are the more theoretical musings of Jacob Klein. These point somewhat in the Benezet direction.

However, all this raises another interesting difference between now and Benezet. That is, the 'informal' mathematics experience of children seems much different today. For instance, check-out at most grocery stores.

Ed Wall

On Sep 3, 2012, at 4:13 AM, Clyde Greeno wrote:

> So arises the question of just what parts of the mathematical basis of the K-middle curriculum can be fully taught/earned "informally" through the learners' experiences with real-life activities. That approach is being pursued by the Tulsa-OK Mathematical Literacy Project ... through creation of show-&-tell videos about such "natural math" activities. The Project is open to advent of an international network of interested professionals ... and to their assistance and contributions. Address inquiries or overtures to clinic@malei.org
>
>
> From: Ed Wall
> Sent: Sunday, September 02, 2012 10:29 PM
> To: math-learn@yahoogroups.com
> Subject: Re: [math-learn] The Effective But Forgotten Benezet Method of K-8 Education
>
>
>
> Some of the original details - slight as they may be - indicate that we are talking here about putting off 'formal' instruction and that, in fact, students engaged in 'informal' mathematics activities in the earlier grades.
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> It seems that this 'putting off', so I have been told, still occurs in those certain private schools where students craft their own curriculum. Similar results, I am told, often follow.
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> In any case, the seen failure of teacher education would seem to be dwarfed by societal and parental opposition. There is no indication, by the way, that Benezet's teachers received any sort of training other than being told, in essence, 'hands-off.' Perhaps in today's parlance that would translate into no 'direct instruction.' However, when formal instruction was begun, it may well have been quite 'direct.'
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> Ed Wall
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> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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