Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » sci.math.* » sci.math.independent

Topic: escaping a tornado
Replies: 65   Last Post: Sep 20, 2012 8:45 PM

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List Jump to Tree View Jump to Tree View   Messages: [ Previous | Next ]
Mike Terry

Posts: 649
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: escaping a tornado
Posted: Sep 17, 2012 5:19 PM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

"quasi" <quasi@null.set> wrote in message
news:3ocv48pns88ckom2bmbkg3b68qemkhgcna@4ax.com...
> A computational challenge (but not too hard) ...
>
> A tornado in the shape of an open disk of radius 2 miles, moves at
> constant speed on a straight course. A man, directly in the path of
> the center of the tornado, notices the tornado when the closest point
> of the boundary of the tornado is 1/4 mile away. If the man can run at
> a speed 20% faster than the speed of tornado, what is the length in
> miles, rounded to 3 decimal places, of the shortest escape path by
> which the man can reach the edge of the rectangular strip of the path
> of the tornado without being enveloped by it?
>
> Use of a CAS is encouraged.
>
> quasi


OK, I'll have a go...

I've already said in other posts how I think the solution path should go, so
here is just a summary - I'm sure it won't make sense for someone just
reading this post in isolation, but perhaps it will help quasi see more
easily where I've gone wrong, assuming we get different answers.

So I consider the path in the frame of the moving tornado. There are three
components:
1) A tangent from the man's start position to the tornado
2) A curved path (arc) around the tornado
3) A final "dash for the edge" where the man runs perpendicular to the
tornado path to the escape line. (This is not perpendicular in the
tornado frame, of course, as the tornado is catching up with the man
during this phase.)

First some constants I used:

R = 2.0; // radius of tornado
S = 2.25; // starting point for man (from centre of tornado)
k = 5.0/6.0; // ratio tornado speed to man speed

A1 = Angle where tangent for 1st path component meets tornado
(measured from direction of tornado travel)

A2 = Angle where tangent for 3rd path component leaves tornado
(measured from direction of tornado travel)

simple calculations:

A1 = acos (R / S) = 0.475882
A2 = atan (k) = 0.694738

Now we have the problem that we know the path we want in the tornado frame
T, but we actually want distances in the fixed (problem statement) frame F.
Given a line element in the T-frame, there is a multiplication factor that
we should multiply it by, to get the F-Frame, which I call M(A). I.e. the
factor is a function of the angle A that the line segment is making with a
perpendicular line IN THE T-FRAME, measured in the direction towards the
tornado. For a given angle A, we can use the cosine rule for triangles to
work out M(A):

M^2 = 1 + (k^2)(M^2) - 2kM*sin(A)

which is a quadratic in M, with solutions:

M(A) = [-k*sin(A) +- sqrt( (k^2)sin^2(A) + 1 - k^2 )] / (1 - k^2)

OK probably we could simplify a bit, but I didn't bother as it was coded in
a program any way so it didn't matter what it looked like! By trial for
known angles it turns out we want the plus sign in the +- in the formula, so
that is my function M(A).

Now we can calculate the components of the path length in the F-Frame, which
is what we want for the final answer:

Path segment 1:

T1 = Length of tangent in Tornado frame = R * tan (A1);
F1 = Length of path segment in fixed frame = M(A1) * T1 = 0.978375
<====

Path segment 2:

The angle is varying along the path here, so we need an integral:
F2 = Length of path segment in fixed frame
= Integral from A1 to A2 of [R * M(A)] dA = 0.372628
<====

Path segment 3:

Since we know A2, it's easiest to just work out the distance from
the outset in the F-Frame, ignoring the tornado frame altogether:
F3 = Length of path segment in fixed frame
= R * (1 - sin(A2)) = 0.719631
<====

So the total distance in the original problem frame (F-frame above) is
F1 + F2 + F3 = 2.070634

Er, that's it!

Hmmm, looking at it now, it looks sort of plausible, but also rather low,
given that the minimum perpendicular distance is 2.00000. Still, maybe the
man doesn't really have to deviate that far from perpendicular to avoid the
tornado - I'll wait to see what quasi makes of it...

Also, I didn't have any CAS to help with the integral in path segment 2, so
I had to write a quick subroutine to estimate the integral, but I'm not 100%
confident I've not accumulated rounding errors, even assuming I've coded it
correctly at all! (It seemed to be working ok on some simple test
functions...)


Regards,
Mike.






Date Subject Author
9/11/12
Read escaping a tornado
quasi
9/12/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
William Elliot
9/12/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/12/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/12/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/12/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
Tim Little
9/12/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/12/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/13/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
adrian dogsbody
9/13/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/13/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
adrian dogsbody
9/13/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/14/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
raycb@live.com
9/14/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/13/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
RGVickson@shaw.ca
9/13/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/13/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/13/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
RGVickson@shaw.ca
9/15/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
William Elliot
9/15/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/15/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/15/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/15/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/15/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
William Elliot
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/15/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
LudovicoVan
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
LudovicoVan
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
LudovicoVan
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
Mike Terry
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
LudovicoVan
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
Mike Terry
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
LudovicoVan
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
LudovicoVan
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
LudovicoVan
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
Mike Terry
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
Mike Terry
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
LudovicoVan
9/17/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/17/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
LudovicoVan
9/17/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/17/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
LudovicoVan
9/17/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
LudovicoVan
9/20/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
RGVickson@shaw.ca
9/20/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
LudovicoVan
9/20/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
LudovicoVan
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
LudovicoVan
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
Mike Terry
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
LudovicoVan
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
LudovicoVan
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
LudovicoVan
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
LudovicoVan
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
LudovicoVan
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
Narasimham
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
Marnie Northington
9/16/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/17/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
adrian dogsbody
9/17/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
Frederick Williams
9/17/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/18/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/18/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi
9/18/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
Frederick Williams
9/17/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
Mike Terry
9/17/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
Tim Little
9/18/12
Read Re: escaping a tornado
quasi

Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.