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Topic: Making a stack.
Replies: 3   Last Post: Oct 24, 2012 3:31 AM

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Simons, F.H.

Posts: 107
Registered: 12/7/04
Re: Making a stack.
Posted: Oct 23, 2012 1:02 AM
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The function AppendTo has attribute HoldFirst; you want to pass the name
queue into the body and not the value. Therefore your function enqueue
must have attribute HoldRest:

In[3]:= Attributes[enqueue] = {HoldRest};
enqueue[x_,queue_]:=AppendTo[queue,x];

In[5]:= queue={1,2,3}; enqueue[4, queue]
Out[6]= {1,2,3,4}

Kind regards,

Fred Simons
Eindhoven University of Technology

Op 22-10-2012 8:03, Brentt schreef:
> Hi, I'm trying to make stack functions like enqueue and dequeue to
> demonstrate algorithms. I know enqueue would do pretty much the same thing
> as AppendTo, but I want the arguments reversed and it to be called
> "enqueue". I figured this would work:
>
> enqueue[x_, queue_] := AppendTo[queue, x];
>
> But it spits out red. I tried to tinker with the evaluation order but to no
> avail. Is anyway to make this work? I want the functions to work like they
> would in a procedural language (I'm not using a procedural language because
> I want to accompany the algorithms with visualizations---i.e. it's for a
> demonstration project). I know I can just use Set when I want to que
> something, but I was hoping to figure out a way to make the code look like
> procedural code, and I'm guessing Mathematica is flexible enough to do
> that.
>
> Any ideas?
>






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