Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » sci.math.* » sci.stat.math.independent

Topic: NHST: Comparing the effect with a standard. The size.
Replies: 0  

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List  
Luis A. Afonso

Posts: 4,617
From: LIsbon (Portugal)
Registered: 2/16/05
NHST: Comparing the effect with a standard. The size.
Posted: Oct 26, 2012 7:03 AM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

NHST: Comparing the effect with a standard. The size.

We are, supposedly, trying to reprove the accepted fact that the observed/measured Normal Population has mean= 3. Following my experiment I had found, with a size 30 random sample, mean=5.917, standard deviation=0.663, we intend to build a 95% Confidence Interval containing D, the excess from established mean=3.
Hence

-2.045 * 0.663/sqrt (30) < 5.917 - (3 + D) <
< 2.045 * 0.663/sqrt (30)

(2.045 are the 97.5% quantile of Student T, 29 degrees of freedom). Therefore we discover that D stays inside the interval [2.67, 3.16]: because it doesn?t contain 0, we can state our find will falls down the common value 3.
Recurring to only standard statistical procedures, the problem could be correctly solved.
__________

The size an effect is revealed

The above scientist intending to forecast how much data should to use in order to prove H0: mean > 5.8, do the following:
sqrt(n) > (0.663 * 2.045)/(5.947 - 5.8) = 11.588, resulting that the size should be at least 135.
Of course . . . if it happens, this time, the standard deviation be a little larger than 0.662 and the intent is spoiled: if it was 1.000 the size amounts to194 or more.

Luis A. Afonso



Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.