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Topic: monopole charges switch Chapt13.409 Pair Production has to equal Pair
Annihilation #1056 New Physics #1176 ATOM TOTALITY 5th ed

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plutonium.archimedes@gmail.com

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Registered: 3/31/08
monopole charges switch Chapt13.409 Pair Production has to equal Pair
Annihilation #1056 New Physics #1176 ATOM TOTALITY 5th ed

Posted: Dec 4, 2012 2:01 AM
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Now I have no good reason to explain how a magnetic monopole charge of
M+ can switch back and forth to M-, in order to suit the situation of
the particle. So that when 1.25x10^5 M+ can just freely
switch to 1.25x10^5M- in order to make a E- charge for the electron.

About the only familiar case I know of magnetic switching is that the
poles of Earth have often switched in a reversal of poles. But I never
thought that pole switching or pole reversal was some inherent
property of magnetic monopoles.

And maybe part of the answer lies with the idea that the existence of
quantized electric charge requires magnetic monopoles, but monopoles
that can reverse their own charge upon demand by the situation.


Now I made a mistake by saying the electron was more primitive in
structure than the photon since in this Double Transverse Wave theory,
the electron needs just one E charge while the photon needs two E
charges. I forgot to include the fact that the rest-mass of 0.5x10^6
eV is required of the other M's so that the electron in base or ground
state is correctly written as this:

              0.5*10^6M- ?0.25*10^6M-           0.25*10^6M+
Where E- = 0.5*10^6M-
While the photon, a radio wave photon is correctly written as this:

              0.5*10^6M- ?1M-           1M+
0.5*10^6M+
or written in short form as this:

E-
1M- 1M+
E+

And now we can easily see how a energetic gamma ray photon:

              0.5*10^6M- ?10^5M-           10^5M
+
0.5*10^6M+

could split apart and form a electron and a positron.

It is not so clear how a energetic electron and energetic positron
can form 2 gamma ray photons unless you had really energetic particles
such as this:

electron:
              0.5*10^6M- ?10^6M-         10^6M+
positron:
              0.5*10^6M+ ?10^6M-         10^6M+
And combining the two yields


              0.5*10^6M- ?2*10^6M-         2* 10^6M+
              0.5*10^6M+

which forms two gamma ray photons each looking like this:
E-
10^6M- 10^6M+
E+
?No physicist of the 20th century took it upon himself to say "suppose
the magnetic monopole exists: then what would be the consequences of
that existence?"

One of the consequences is that monopoles switch charge, freely and
dictated by the circumstance.
Another consequence is that 0.5x10^6 monopoles
equals 1 electric charge E.

The electron is more complex than the photon, since the electron has
more overall M's than the photon.

The radio wave photon is the most primitive as seen here:

E-
1M- 1M+
E+

The most primitive particle of all is the electron-neutrino that can
be as small as
M- M+ having only 2eV kinetic energy and no rest-mass.

The electron has the lowest rest-mass of all particles and all other
particles with rest-mass must be larger than 0.5MeV.

Google's New-Newsgroups censors AP posts and halted a proper
archiving of author, but Drexel's Math Forum does not and my posts?in
archive form is seen here:

http://mathforum.org/kb/profile.jspa?userID=499986

Archimedes Plutonium
http://www.iw.net/~a_plutonium
whole entire Universe is just one big atom
where dots of the electron-dot-cloud are galaxies



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