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Topic: Is every physical property relative?
Replies: 5   Last Post: Dec 16, 2012 5:28 AM

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Victor Porton

Posts: 529
Registered: 8/1/05
Is every physical property relative?
Posted: Dec 15, 2012 4:10 PM
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From my blog:

http://portonmath.wordpress.com/2012/12/15/complete-relativity-theory/

Disclaimer: I am not a physicist.

Einstein has discovered that some physical properties are relative.

In this blog post I present the conjecture that essentially all physical
properties are relative. I do not formulate exact details of this theory, a
thing which could be measurable, but just a broad class of specific
theories. Nevertheless the theory which I formulate in this blog post is
mathematically exact.

Let P is the set of (relative) physical properties. We will make L into
poset by the order of which properties are more relative and which are less
relative. (With the axiom that less relative properties may be always
restored knowing more relative properties.)

Consider the filter F characterizing positive infinity (that is infinitely
least relative properties) on the poset P.

My conjecture: The only really existing (non-relative) physical properties
are values of relative properties on the filter F.

Formally: The only really existing physical object is a monovalued reloid*
whose domain is the filter F.

My theory may become into something verifiable by experiment if someone
specifies what is F exactly.

* "reloid" is defined in my math research:
http://www.mathematics21.org/algebraic-general-topology.html

--
Victor Porton - http://portonvictor.org



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