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Topic: Has anyone got code for a Smith Chart?
Replies: 1   Last Post: Jan 11, 2013 10:23 PM

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David Park

Posts: 1,557
Registered: 5/19/07
Re: Has anyone got code for a Smith Chart?
Posted: Jan 11, 2013 10:23 PM
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The Complex Graphics routines in the Presentations Application contain
routines that make it quite easy to draw Smith Charts and plot impedence
curves on them.

I have posted an example at Peter Lindsay's web site at the Mathematics
department at St. Andrews University. It should appear within a few days. It
has a Mathematica notebook and a PDF file.

http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/~pl10/c/djmpark/


David Park
djmpark@comcast.net
http://home.comcast.net/~djmpark/index.html




From: David Kirkby [mailto:drkirkby@gmail.com]

I'm looking to plot data colected via an experiement on a Smith Chart. Does
anyone have code for one, which will save me the not-inconserable effort of
writing one?

There is one in the Wolfram archive
http://library.wolfram.com/infocenter/Demos/441/
but that is written for a very old version of Mathematica, and it appears
unable to plot experimental data.

There is also a Smith Chart on the Wolfram Demonstrations project

http://demonstrations.wolfram.com/TheSmithChart/

but that one has a serious flaw. If one puts R=50 Ohms, C=0, L=0, then the
point should be in the middle of the Smith chart, not to the far right hand
side. It must be the most obvious point to plot on a Smith chart, but it
fails.

Dave





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