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Topic: neutron decay contradicts Standard Model Chapt15.39 Glossary of
concepts and terms of Physics #1153 New Physics #1273 ATOM TOTALITY 5th ed

Replies: 8   Last Post: Jan 16, 2013 3:22 PM

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herbert glazier

Posts: 192
Registered: 7/26/10
Re: Experiments to confirm that electrons lead in Neutron decay, not
the proton Chapt15.39 Glossary of concepts and terms of Physics #1156 New
Physics #1276 ATOM TOTALITY 5th ed

Posted: Jan 15, 2013 8:48 AM
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On Jan 15, 5:27 am, Archimedes Plutonium
<plutonium.archime...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Jan 14, 2:03 pm, Archimedes Plutonium<plutonium.archime...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> (snipped)
>
> --- quote from Wikipedia ---> [edit]Free neutron decay

> > Outside the nucleus, free neutrons are unstable and have a mean
> > lifetime of 881.5±1.5 s (about 14 minutes, 42 seconds); therefore the
> > half-life for this process (which differs from the mean lifetime by a
> > factor of ln(2) = 0.693) is 611.0±1.0 s (about 10 minutes, 11 seconds).
> > [5] Free neutrons decay by emission of an electron and an electron
> > antineutrino to become a proton, a process known as beta decay:[20]
> > n0 ? p+ + e? + ?
> > e
> > The decay energy for this process (based on the masses of neutrino,
> > proton, and electron) is 0.782 343 MeV. The maximal energy of the beta
> > decay electron (in the process wherein the neutrino receives vanishing
> > kinetic energy) has been measured at 0.782 ± .013 MeV.[21]

>
> --- end quote from Wikipedia ---
>
> Now I wanted to comment on that long Wikipedia quote, because I can
> pull out some logic from the facts and data listed.
>
> In the above it says that the electron is leading the neutron in its
> decay because it is BETA Decay that is starting the process of the
> Neutron decaying.
>
> Earlier in that quote, it said that the leading actions of the neutron
> decay was the changing of the proton from udd to that of udu. And the
> next paragraphs on beta decay of the electron contradicting the udu as
> the instigator of the decay.
>
> So here we see that the reason for the Neutron, the free neutron to
> decay is started by the electron becoming a beta decay inside the
> neutron itself. So what starts a beta decay, whether it is inside a
> neutron or inside a atom?
>
> So we need a new and fresh experiment in physics to answer the
> question, what leads or starts the neutron to decay? Is it the proton
> as the Standard Model with its quark theory (nonsense) suggests, or is
> the electron that starts the action of the free neutron to decay?
>
> Now this new experiment maybe awfully tough to answer, because it is
> difficult to separate out whether the instigator is the proton or the
> electron.
>
> But as that Wikipedia quote further states, that a small fraction of
> neutron decays have the electron stuck to the proton to make a
> hydrogen atom rather than a free proton, free electron, and neutrino.
>
> These facts of already known properties indicate that the electron is
> the
> instigator of the neutron to decay.
>
> --
> Google's archives are top-heavy in hate-spew from search-engine-
> bombing. Only Drexel's Math Forum has done a excellent, simple and
> fair archiving of AP posts for the past 15 years as seen here:
>
> http://mathforum.org/kb/profile.jspa?userID=499986
>
> Archimedes Plutoniumhttp://www.iw.net/~a_plutonium
> whole entire Universe is just one big atom
> where dots of the electron-dot-cloud are galaxies


I know why neutrons decay when free. I know what keeps them from
decaying when part of an atoms nucleus. I will do a post on this in a
few days. TreBert PS my thinking is helped by the fact I think
"structures"



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